New Video: Dizzy Wright – “Outrageous” Featuring Big K.R.I.T.

Dizzy Wright releases his powerful visual for his single “Outrageous” featuring Big K.R.I.T.. The video shows the realities going on in our country, while Dizzy and K.R.I.T. narrate with their dope verses. “Outrageous” was shot by BLKMINDS and Directed by Ace.

New Music: Dizzy Wright – “Outrageous” Featuring Big K.R.I.T.

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Dizzy Wright recruited Big K.R.I.T. for his song “Outrageous,” which is featured on his new album “The Golden Age 2.” The duo touch on social injustices and falling trap to the system. Listen to the song below. “The Golden Age 2” is out now!

SwaysUniverse.com: Bun B Talks Big K.R.I.T.’s Big Influence On Creating An Album

Bun B stops by Sway In The Morning to discuss his new album “Bernard”, anxiety, depression and choosing to be independent. But Sway always has something up his sleeve, and Big K.R.I.T. phones in to discuss the creating process in Part 1 of a 2 part interview.

HipHopDX.com: Bun B On Recruiting Big K.R.I.T. For New Album

Bun B spoke with HipHopDx and let a huge secret out of the bag. He started by letting the world know that he is working on an album; “Bernard,” and that he has chosen Big K.R.I.T. to be his music coordinator. “I’m using actually Big K.R.I.T. as my musical coordinator,” he says. “So he’s been doing production on the album. He’s been actually singing on the album, but more importantly, help to kind of craft a sound of my own.”

Can’t wait to hear what these two cook up!

Read Full Article: HERE

BIG K.R.I.T. in Houston on te%

Keyon Harrold – “Stay This Way” Featuring Bilal & Big K.R.I.T.

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There is a sense of pensive melancholy as the wail of Keyon Harrold’s trumpet pushes its way past the Hitchcock-esque piano that sets the tone for “Stay This Way.” With Philadelphia singer Bilal and Southern rapper Big K.R.I.T. contributing vocals, the song asks if euphoric moments are meant to last, or if they’re naturally fleeting.

Keyon Harrold kicks off his Blue Note residency this month with two shows each night, starting Jan. 10 with Bilal and Big K.R.I.T.

Read Full Article: HERE

Dallas Cowboys Use Big K.R.I.T.’s “Dominate” For Their “Sunday Night Football” Theme Song

Big K.R.I.T.’s  “Dominate” was chosen by the Dallas Cowboys to be their theme song on the field. K.R.I.T. is definitely known for his motivating music, and his music has always been embraced by athletes. Dex Bryant has been a fan of Krizzle’s music for a few years now, making this collaboration a great match.

 

Genius.com: Big K.R.I.T. Breaks Down “Might Not Be OK” On Genius’ ‘VERIFIED’

Big K.R.I.T. had a lot to get off his chest when he stepped into the studio to record “Might Not Be Ok” with saxophonist Kenneth Whalum in July. The 30-year-old rapper was just days removed from releasing his #12For12 freestyle series, but felt compelled to hop back in the booth to address the wave of police brutality cases in America—particularly the tragic July murder of Baton Rouge, La. man Alton Sterling.

Read all the lyrics on Genius: HERE

www.Genius.com

PigeonsAndPlanes.com: WOLFE de MÇHLS “Sunset Park” Featuring Big K.R.I.T.

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“We all bare of our emotions, but do yours over surface? Do your dreams come true when you give your all? Or do your nightmares worsen? Are you looking for someone that can always call when you’re closing your curtains?”

These are some of the questions WOLFE de MÇHLS asked on his latest self-produced single “Sunset Park,” the latest single off of his debut album NAKED. You can hear the Houston influence in both the production and vocals as WOLFE croons over the smooth production before Big K.R.I.T. hops in and delivers a solid verse.

www.PigeonsAndPlanes.com

SPIN.com: Big K.R.I.T. On Police Violence

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Nearly 900 people have died at the hands of the police in 2016. According to the Washington Post, 800 of those people were shot to death. With the most important election of this generation looming–and the conversation around the ethics, corruption, morality, and overt xenophobia associated with the presidential campaigns continuing to heightenSPIN asked politically-minded musicians to speak on issues that matter. For November’s digital cover story, artists will look at police brutality, racial profiling and identity, immigration, welfare reform, climate change, and more, asking: What’s going on? 

The following is taken from Big K.R.I.T.’s own words, as told to SPIN’s Andy Cush. 

When I stepped onstage at the BET Hip Hop Awards last month, I felt anger, frustration, sadness, and hopelessness. It was overwhelming, and it also felt like a blessing. I was performing my verse from a song I did with Kenneth Whalum called “Might Not Be OK,” and I chose to wear a police uniform. Eight bars in, if you didn’t see the uniform, you might not know where the narrative was coming from. “Stop asking questions, why you filming? / You look suspicious, I think you dealing / Step out of the car, fit the description.” It’s that split second when someone’s ready to take your life.

Philando Castile was killed by police in Minnesota, Terence Crutcher in Minnesota, Keith Scott in Charlotte. The NYPD killed a woman with a mental illness in the Bronx just a couple weeks ago. This has always been going on, but now we have videos of it. Now you can see it, and that brings a new energy to any interaction with an officer. As much as you want everything to be okay, you know there are some people who don’t want you to be alive, or to see you doing well. A simple traffic stop could be the end of your life. That’s not what I used to think growing up, when getting pulled over meant thinking, “Aw, man. I don’t want to go to jail.” Now you think, “I don’t want to get killed. What should I do with my hands so that I don’t get killed?”

I’m from Meridian, Mississippi–it’s a small city where everybody knows everybody. Growing up in my neighborhood, you would usually know the police officer on patrol. Maybe he was your friend’s uncle, or something like that. He doesn’t want to see you get in trouble. He’d want to keep you out of those situations. When a kid was outside kicking it, instead of putting him against the wall, an officer might just say, “Hey, go home. I know your mama’s waiting for you.” And it goes both ways: If a person in the neighborhood saw a police officer they knew, they’d say, “Hey, how’s it going? Thanks for keeping us safe.”

Read Full Article: HERE