Big K.R.I.T. – “KRITically Acclaimed Tour” (Episode 2) [Dir. By: WildSoul Films]

WildSoul Films Presents another episode to Big K.R.I.T.’s “KRITically Acclaimed Tour” documentary. This episode features Big K.R.I.T. and a few of his celebrity friends. From Hannibal Burress to Mara Hruby performing “Do You Love Me,” to Warren G hitting the stage for “No Static.” Watch it now and cop your tickets for the southern leg of the tour now at www.BIGKRIT.com/TOUR.

 

 

 

 

VIBE.com: Big K.R.I.T. – “It’s Better This Way” (Album Review)

IBTW_FRONT-1000Long before the Def Jam deal, Meridian, Mississippi’s Big K.R.I.T. was staking his claim as one of the most promising new emcees in the industry. Sure, there were hoards of trap fans and critics that brushed him off. But a man that can back up his promises with raw product are destined to win.

Well, fast-forward to 2015 and Big K.R.I.T., the self-proclaimed King of the South, still screams that he’s one of the illest to grip the mic. Two studio albums and a host of mixtapes later, and K.R.I.T. has consistently delivered music that captivates the soul.
In rap, hood stories don’t always sound as compelling without the tales of travelling the worn out path of obstacles and frustrations. But K.R.I.T. has his fair share of testimonies to wax poetically about. Even though Krizzle’s underground fame is enough to keep him on the road 24/7, he’s also one of the most overlooked.

On the ‘Sip native’s latest mixtape, It’s Better This Way, K.R.I.T rolls out a high grade of hip-hop blues about his tattered journey of turning hip-hop dreams into reality in the face of hardships. In retrospect, every roadblock that K.R.I.T encountered has made him into the man and MC that he is today.

One almost feels sorry for K.R.I.T. as he tells stories about Def Jam cutting his budget and even going without a budget at times in his career. But feeling sorry for KR.I.T. is far from his aim. Instead, It’s Better This Way serves as a lesson of trekking that rugged path enroute to ones destiny. It’s the individual stories that add unique patches to the quilt of life. And K.R.I.T. embraces every stitch, bleach stain, rip and tear on his quilt.

Read Full Article: HERE

Fall Out Boy “Jet Pack Blues(Remix)” Feat. Big K.R.I.T.

Fall Out Boy tap Big K.R.I.T. to spit on their remix of “Jet Pack Blues.” This collab is 1 of many remixes that they released on their “Make American Psycho Again” album.

 

 

 

Big K.R.I.T. – “KRITically Acclaimed Tour” (Episode 1) [Dir. By: WILDSOUL Films]

Checkout the first episode of Big K.R.I.T.’s “KRITically Acclaimed Tour” videography, Directed By WILDSOUL Films. Make sure you checkout Big K.R.I.T. when he comes to a city near you. 

Get TICKETS and V.I.P. MEET & GREET PACKAGES: HERE

RiverFrontTimes.com: Big K.R.I.T. Takes The Road Less Traveled To Find Success

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The past year has been one of tremendous artistic growth for Meridian, Mississippi rapper Big K.R.I.T. (an acronym that stands for King Remembered In Time). The theatrical trailer for the hit movie Sicario featured one of his songs and the rapper embarked on an Australian tour. After years of being in complete control of his creative process — from the production and songwriting to the mixing and mastering of his projects — K.R.I.T. finally decided to venture away from his comfort zone during the recording of Cadillactica, his second album with Def Jam. The album was well received by many critics, but K.R.I.T. still finds himself fighting for respect in some aspects.

“I’m so used to producing for myself, pretty much, and kind of really sticking to what I enjoy as far as drum packages and samples and the things that I use,” he says via phone. “So when I started working on Cadillactica, it was more about me trying to get out of that by working with other producers and using more obscure instruments, and just challenging myself even about where I was recording.”

Based in Atlanta, the rapper/producer traveled to Miami to record with Jim Jonsin, and also spent time in Los Angeles. “I was just trying to not be in my house and working so much,” he says. “Even just being able to get in the studio with the producers that I was working with freed me up to write a little bit differently. I could dive deeper into Cadillactica. I wanted the album to sound sonically different than anything I had done before that.”

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The night before this interview was scheduled to take place, K.R.I.T. released a surprise project It’s Better This Way. “It’s really all about becoming comfortable in my space,” he says when asked about his approach to creating his latest mixtape. “I’m not really chasing the sound that everybody else is on or chasing what people are familiar with on radio, but just kind of finding my own pocket or my own niche and building on it as much as possible. I’m not doing it all by myself, but rather while working with musicians who can bring certain parts to life and make sure that the music moves. It may not be your favorite record on the radio or take off like that but over time, people will gravitate to my content and my sound because they know they can’t get it anywhere else.”

Read Full Article: HERE

Hermitude “The Buzz” Featuring Big K.R.I.T., Mataya & Young Tapz (Video)

Checkout the official video for Hermitude’s collaboration with Big K.R.I.T. “The Buzz” Featuring Malaya & Young Tapz, from their new album “Dark Night Sweet Light.”

 

ColumbusAlive.com: Big K.R.I.T. Returns To Earth With “It’s Better This Way”

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With Cadillactica, from 2014, Mississippi rapper Big K.R.I.T. launched into outer space, crafting a futuristic song suite that unfolded on a fictional planet that shared a name with the album’s title.

“I was so close to the sun I burnt the top off my roof,” the MC stated matter-of-factly on “Life,” an interstellar romp where he bypassed comets and asteroids en route to his final destination.

But for his new mixtape, It’s Better This Way, which surfaced in mid-October, K.R.I.T., born Justin Scott 29 years ago, returns to his home planet, turning out a series of warm, soul-flecked tracks designed to transport listeners to his birthplace of Meridian, Mississippi.

“I had to come back down to earth a little bit this time,” said K.R.I.T., reached by phone prior to the kickoff of his fall tour, which includes a live backing band — a first for the rapper — and a stop at Park Street Saloon on Thursday, Nov. 5.

Opener “King Pt. 4” sets the tone, building on horns that mirror warm southern winds, breakbeat drums and the rapper’s breezy, conversational flow. Throughout, K.R.I.T. makes mentions of soil and of emerging from the dirt — the lyrical equivalent of a space traveler kneeling to grab fistfuls of earth after touching back down on terra firma.

Since emerging with K.R.I.T. Wuz Here in 2010, the rapper has amassed a wide, deep catalog of songs that, taken collectively, paint a vivid, flaws-and-all portrait of an individual navigating the strains of day-to-day existence, and his music frequently touches on budgetary woes, romantic misgivings and the importance of faith to maintaining a sense of equilibrium in a world designed to knock us off balance.

“I’m not trying to take the funk,” K.R.I.T. said. “I figured out I don’t have to rap about nothing other than my life. It may not be glamorous, and it may not have a shock value, but it’s still got soul, and there’s an honesty to it. When people see me out and about and have conversations with me, I can be myself. I don’t have to be no superhero rapper. I can just be K.R.I.T., aka Justin Scott.”

Early in his career, K.R.I.T. concerned himself more deeply with commercial success, stressing when commercial radio didn’t jump on his latest single. More recently, however, the rapper has come to embrace his lack of a defining hit as a net positive, since it’s allowed him to gradually develop a fan base willing to follow his music wherever the creative muse might lead — be it to far-off galaxies or small southern towns.

“When I first started, I wanted a record to take off, and I wanted that attention and those accolades,” he said. “But I’m 270 songs in — maybe more than that now — and we can go on the road and perform for an hour and people know all the content; they’re not sitting back and waiting for you to play that one radio single.”

Read Full Article: HERE

HuffingtonPost.com: Big K.R.I.T. Discusses New Music And State Of Hip Hop

Rapper and producer Justin Scott, known better as Big K.R.I.T, is back on the music scene with his seventh mixtape, ‘It’s Better This Way.’ The Mississippi native joins HuffPost Live to discuss his new music and the state of hip-hop today.

www.HuffingtonPost.com

CleveScene.com: Big K.R.I.T. Takes the Road Less Traveled To Find Success

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The past year has been one of tremendous artistic growth for Meridian, Miss. rapper Big K.R.I.T. (an acronym that stands for King Remembered In Time). The theatrical trailer for the hit movie Sicario featured one of his songs and the rapper embarked on an Australian tour. After years of being in complete control of his creative process — from the production and songwriting to the mixing and mastering of his projects — K.R.I.T. finally decided to venture away from his comfort zone during the recording of Cadillactica, his second album with Def Jam. The album was well received by many critics, but K.R.I.T. still finds himself fighting for respect in some aspects.

“I’m so used to producing for myself pretty much and kind of really sticking to what I enjoy as far as drum packages and samples and the things that I use,” he says via phone. “So when I started working on Cadillactica, it was more about me trying to get out of that by working with other producers and using more obscure instruments and just challenging myself even about where I was recording.”

Based in Atlanta, the rapper/producer traveled to Miami to record with Jim Jonsin and also spent time in Los Angeles as well. “I was just trying to not be in my house and working so much,” he says. “Even just being able to get in the studio with the producers that I was working with freed me up to write a little bit differently. I could dive deeper into Cadillactica. I wanted the album to sound sonically different than anything I had done before that.”

The night before this interview was scheduled to take place, K.R.I.T. released a surprise project It’s Better This Way. “It’s really all about becoming comfortable in my space,” he says when asked about his approach to creating his latest mixtape. “I’m not really chasing the sound that everybody else is on or chasing what people are familiar with on radio, but just kind of finding my own pocket or my own niche and building on it as much as possible. I’m not doing it all by myself, but rather while working with musicians who can bring certain parts to life and make sure that the music moves. It may not be your favorite record on the radio or take off like that but over time, people will gravitate to my content and my sound because they know they can’t get it anywhere else.”

He says he plans to continue in the same artistic direction.

“I’m just excited to keep this feel and this vibe going musically,” he says. “It’s just a brighter aspect, because I’m happy with where I am in life and it definitely shows in the music. At the same time, the person I was during [the 2010 mixtape] Krit Wuz Here isn’t the person I am now as far as experiencing life, and I really want to take people with me on this journey musically.”

Read Full Article:HERE

Big K.R.I.T. & Rapsody – “Guillotine Flow” [Prod. By: 9th Wonder]

Late last week, Big K.R.I.T.’s Kritically Acclaimed tour landed him in North Carolina. While there, he connected with N.C.’s own Rapsody—who he last linked with for the “Lonely Thoughts” remix—and today he has delivered an artifact from their few hours together, a nonchalant one-off titled “Guillotine Flow.” Over a sepia toned, soul-sampling beat by 9th Wonder, the two rappers trade pinpoint precise bars. Because, as Rapsody spits during her turn, All I ever needed was that trill guillotine flow.
“Steel sharpens steel, so I always enjoy creating with the King of the South,” wrote Rapsody via email to The FADER about the song. “This was a record we definitely got to sharpen our swords on, and just make something dope.”

www.FADER.com